31 December 2020

Australia's most beautiful and exciting images of 2020

Tourism Australia's most loved shots of the whole year
Tourism Australia offers an unprecedented photographic selection. This year, marked by the pandemic, it still retained some iconic and super popular shots on social media. The sails of the Sydney Opera House illuminated with moving images dedicated to the Australian firefighters, who fought to fight forest fires across the country, was among the most clicked and loved images of this year. In a period in which being in contact with one's loved ones was not always easy, the photo of a quokka mother with her little joey, small kangaroos and koalas, were among the most moving images among the Australian wildlife.
 
Tourism Australia's most loved shots of the whole year
Photo 1 
Thank You Firefighters - Sydney Opera House, New South Wales 
Credit: @sydneyoperahouse
 
This image of the Sydney Opera House sails illuminated with a moving tribute to Australian firefighters, who at the time were battling bushfires across the country, was the most popular post this year.
 
Thank You Firefighters - Sydney Opera House, New South Wales  Credit: @sydneyoperahouse
Thank You Firefighters - Sydney Opera House, New South Wales. Credit: @sydneyoperahouse
 
Capture your own striking image at Badu Gili, a seven-minute animated projection of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art that graces the sails of the Opera House nightly. Badu Gili, which means ‘water light’, celebrates the ancient stories and rich contemporary culture of Australia’s First Nations.
 
Photo 2
Quokka & Joey - Rottnest Island, Western Australia 
Credit: @cruzysuzy / @meiji_nguyen_photography
 
Australia is known as the home to some of the world’s cutest animals. But none are more photogenic than the quokka. Apart from a small colony on the mainland, they are only found on Rottnest Island in Western Australia.
 
Quokka & Joey - Rottnest Island, Western Australia  Credit: @cruzysuzy / @meiji_nguyen_photography
Quokka & Joey - Rottnest Island, Western Australia. Credit: @cruzysuzy / @meiji_nguyen_photography
 
Quokkas are naturally curious, so you do not need to approach them or offer them food to get close enough for a photograph. Simply get down to their level and wait for them to come to you. Remember that it is illegal to touch or feed quokkas, so keep a respectful distance and use a selfie stick for the best photo
 
Photo 3
Hemsworth Holiday - Lord Howe Island, New South Wales 
Credit: @chrishemsworth
 
Early this year, Tourism Australia’s Global Ambassador, Chris Hemsworth and his extended family, including brothers Liam and Luke, enjoyed a family getaway to the lush island paradise that is Lord Howe Island, located off the coast of New South Wales, Australia.
 
Hemsworth Holiday - Lord Howe Island, New South Wales  Credit: @chrishemsworth
Hemsworth Holiday - Lord Howe Island, New South Wales. Credit: @chrishemsworth
 
Highlights of the trip shared on social channels revealed an island itinerary packed with surfing, fishing and beach activities. With only 400 visitors allowed on the island at any time, Lord Howe Island is one of Australia’s best-kept secrets. Fringed with coral reefs and turquoise lagoons, and topped with mountain valleys and sea-cliffs, you can fly to this secret island paradise from Sydney or Brisbane
 
Photo 4
Bioluminescence - Jervis Bay, New South Wales 
Credit: @jordan_robins
 
Jervis Bay is renowned for its white sandy beaches, however the beaches in the area are even more wondrous at night. Due to a natural chemical reaction within plankton, the plankton become luminescent and emanate a blue glow.
 
Bioluminescence - Jervis Bay, New South Wales  Credit: @jordan_robins
Bioluminescence - Jervis Bay, New South Wales. Credit: @jordan_robins
 
This unusual natural phenomenon, which can only be seen at night, can happen at any time of the year, but is more common in spring and summer months when the water is warmer. While the magical display is difficult to predict, the presence of red algae during the day may indicate a higher chance of bioluminescence in the evening. Jervis Bay is not the only place in Australia you can see this occur, with it being reported in the Whitsundays - Queensland, Port Lincoln - South Australia and Lauderdale Tasmania.
 
Photo 5
Koala & Joey Cuddle - WILD LIFE Sydney Zoo, New South Wales 
Credit: @reneehowell18 / @wildlifesydneyzoo
 
There are plenty of places to spot a koala in AustraliaLone Pine Koala Sanctuary, the world’s first and largest koala sanctuary is located just outside of Brisbane and is home to more than 130 koalas - the best part: you can hold one any day of the week. Other places you can cuddle a koala include Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary on the Gold Coast, Kangaroo Island Wildlife Park in South Australia and Cohunu Koala Park in Western Australia. Alternatively, pop in to have breakfast with a koala at Wild Life Sydney Zoo.  
 
Photo 6 
Rockpool Chills - Macquarie Pass National Park, New South Wales 
Credit: @_aswewander
 
Travellers looking to soak in a spa bath will be pleased to know that a spectacular range of natural spas, hot springs and fresh watering holes can be found all over Australia – and most won’t cost you a cent! At Macquarie Pass National Park in New South Wales, a natural swimming hole can be found at the bottom of Macquarie Pass.
 
Rockpool Chills - Macquarie Pass National Park, New South Wales  Credit: @_aswewander
Rockpool Chills - Macquarie Pass National Park, New South Wales. Credit: @_aswewander
 
The perfect spot for a photo, soak into the fresh cool water with the sounds of a waterfall in the background. Other rock pools popular with photographers include the Fairy Pools at Granite Bay in Noosa National Park and Cardwell Spa Pool in Girringun National Park, south of Cairns in Queensland’s tropical north.
 
Photo 7 
Friendly Kangaroo - North Stradbroke Island, Queensland 
Credit: @_markfitz
 
A visit to North Stradbroke Island ('Straddie' to locals) charms with its retro, laid back vibe. Make like a local and hit the beach or delve into the Queensland sand island’s fascinating history.
 
Friendly Kangaroo - North Stradbroke Island, Queensland  Credit: @_markfitz
Friendly Kangaroo - North Stradbroke Island, Queensland. Credit: @_markfitz
 
And did we mention there are kangaroos just hopping about, ready for their close-up? Also keep a keen eye out for resident kangaroos, kookaburras and koalas, and late May and early November spot whales migrating up the famed humpback highway
 
Photo/Video 8
Whale Breach - Gold Coast, Queensland  
Credit: @seaworldcruises 
 
Ok, so you’ve been whale watching, and you’re thinking ‘what’s the big deal?’. The big deal is the sheer number of whales that migrate along Australia’s east and west coasts – we’re talking tens of thousands of humpbacks, not to mention a solid smattering of southern right and blue whales. The whales head north to the warmer waters of Tropical North Queensland and the Kimberley to calve then back down the coast, resulting in the longest whale watching season in the world. Hotspots on the east coast include the Whitsundays, Hervey Bay, the Gold CoastSydney and the Sunshine Coast, where you can even swim with humpback whales. Over in Western Australia, your best whale watching spots are the coastal towns of Albany, Augusta, Busselton, Fremantle and Broome.
 
Edited by Alisè Vitri
Text and photos: © Ufficio stampa Turismo Australia
Photo Visual: Copyright © Sisterscom.com / Wendis100 / Depositphotos
All rights reserved. Reproduction prohibited.
Copyright © Sisterscom.com
 

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